nfl

Supreme Court ruling on trademarks expected to help Redskins

Scot McCloughan was fired by the in March, a move that ended a brief run with the team that began with optimism and ended under a cloud of rumors and suspicion.

McCloughan is no longer tied to the ‘Skins, so why not do something with what we presume is a sizable amount of team merch? McCloughan’s visual trademark with Washington was a camouflage Redskins cap, and that’s one of the items he’s now put up for auction on eBay.

In his opinion for the court, Justice Samuel Alito rejected arguments that trademarks are government speech, not private speech. Alito also said trademarks are not immune from First Amendment protection as part of a government program or subsidy.

Tam insisted he was not trying to be offensive, but wanted to transform a derisive term into a statement of pride. The Redskins also contend their name honors American Indians, but the team has faced decades of legal challenges from Indian groups that say the name is racist.

Allen danced around the question of whether the team would hire an actual GM or simply add to the player personnel and scouting staff.

“From the beginning, you know, I’m real proud of what the guys did this year in free agency and in this draft,” Allen said. “As I’ve said, we have a lot of quality people who performed well under some tough situations this year. This draft class, the excitement it’s brought to our locker room, it’s exciting, so we’re looking to add to [the front office], we’ll see who that is.”

Three months after firing former general manager Scot McCloughan, the club announced their new leadership structure Tuesday morning with franchise legend Doug Williams taking the lead personnel role.jersey

Williams, 61, has been a personnel executive with the Redskins since 2014 and will now be the senior vice president of player personnel. Team president Bruce Allen will remain prominent inside the organization, with both Williams and coach Jay Gruden reporting to him.

On Monday night’s edition of NFL Network’s “Top 100 Players of 2017,” Kirk Cousins was revealed at No. 70. Ranking three slots higher than six-time Pro Bowler Philip Rivers, Cousins has a pretty high standing on this list, which was voted on by the players themselves. Interesting that the players are so high on Cousins’ game when his team doesn’t appear to be quite as certain.

For the second straight year, Cousins is set to play under the franchise tag, having been unable to strike a long-term deal with the Washington Redskins. Consequently, the future’s unclear for this 28-year-old signal caller who has posted some pretty impressive numbers over the past two seasons: 17-14-1 record with a 99.3 passer rating, 68.3 completion percentage and 54:23 TD-to-INT ratio.

This rivalry is one of the league’s most famous, but there was something nefarious brewing before the were even born. Former Redskins owner didn’t want any team in the South, taking the view that his team owned that market. (Originally, the lyrics to the song included a line about fighting “for ol’ Dixie.”) Clint Murchison, who was trying to establish the team that became the Cowboys, bought the rights to “Hail to the Redskins.” And boom, the Cowboys had a franchise. I should probably really have put this in the Cowboys article, no?

How about this? The Redskins beat the Cowboys in the 1982 NFC Championship Game, which handed Dallas its third consecutive defeat in the NFC title game. It also spelled the last gasp for the Cowboys’ championship window; we wouldn’t hear from them again until 1992. So if any Cowboys fan gives you grief, tell him (or her) that.